New Words from the Golden City

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I’m close to setting up a pre-order page for After the War, the final (chronologically) novella in the Golden City series.  I’m still waiting on the cover, but as soon as that’s finalized, I’ll work on turning that live. (The cover artist–Rachel A, Marks–is also a writer, and she’s in the midst of edits for her next book.)

My planned date for After the War to go on sale is August 1, although that might change if there are complications.

In addition, my patrons have received the first chapter in a new work that tells of the meetings of Miguel Gaspar, Gabriel Anjos, Nadezhda Vladimirova, and the Lady.  I’ve jokingly called them my Torchwood in the past because they seem to work behind the scenes, focusing on the creepy and weird stuff. (if you don’t understand the reference, that’s OK.)

The work is very tentatively titled The Undiscovered Truth, although that may change.  (The first chapter is available here on my website, but it’s password protected so that only my patrons see it.)

#SFWAPro

 

Reflections on first person…

I’ve been working on cleaning up my mss of Whatever Else (for some reason, a lot of periods were deleted) and that led me to think about writing first person rather than third.

I have a limited number of stories in which I used first person, and for most of those, I was trying to portray a specific ‘voice’.

For example, A Hand for Each was written to sound similar to the writing of Richard Dana (Two Years Before the Mast).  I wanted the narrator to sound like an English seaman.

After five long years of herding freighters about the Indian peninsula, we had finally been given orders to return home. How I longed to see England again. My family wrote to me but their letters often went astray, likely arriving in a port we had just left. I knew that I missed many of them.

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The Stains of the Past was meant to sound more like a young woman with a past: 

I believe in redemption. Every week when I go to confession, the priest tells me my sins are forgiven. I am a new person now, he has explained, and my penitence has created in me a clean heart. Unfortunately, my sins haven’t been forgotten. My past will always be with me, at least as far as Kiya is concerned.

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In The Nature of Demons, I wanted the hapless narrator to sound a bit like Dr. Watson. I was thrilled when one of the critiquers actually mentioned that my Dr. Antris sounded like…Dr. Watson!

A more educated man would have recognized the signs, I thought.  Only a week before, the king had forced Menhas’ company on me, naming him a shaman among his tribe — a storyteller and healer.  As such, I expected him to have at least a passing familiarity with the hundred forms of demons.  “Do your people not have stories of these creatures?”

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In Fleurs du Mal, I wanted the protagonist to be disdainful and cold.

I looked at Anne instead. She clung to Jeremy’s arm with one hand as we walked, her hips swaying as if she still heard a tango in the night air. I couldn’t decide what to make of her attachment to him. He is far out of his league, I thought, my trusting little brother.

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And in Whatever Else, I wanted my main character to sound…a bit helpless. She’s in a society where women are chattel, and has never been trained to do more than be a wife. So it was a difficult voice for me to write, but I hope I cam up with the right one:

His sudden claim baffled me. Arras had been my husband nearly four years. Three years older than my nineteen, Seyvas was of an age with him; even through the worst of our peoples’ squabbling, he and Arras had remained friends. Since our wedding, though, Seyvas hadn’t come to the manor at all. Not until now.

I turned back to him and whispered, “What are you talking about? You’ve known Arras all your life.”

“Arras is dead,” my brother answered in a flat voice, his eyes gone bleak

I stared at him, mouth agape.

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So for me, the choice of first person is usually tied to the fact that I want the POV character to sound different than me. I want them to have a very distinctive personality.

What’s your reasoning behind the times that you chose to write in first person?

#SFWAPro

Writing Advice: Should I Plot? Or Pants?

This is one of those strange areas in which the answer seems perfectly obvious: whatever works.

The problem that most people have isn’t grasping the fact that while plotting works for some authors, it doesn’t work for others. Most people get that.

The problem is, they don’t know which option will work for them.

For me, it’s a mixed bag.

I’ll give you two examples:

  1. I woke up one morning with a story idea in my head. I outlined it, and started typing. (My outline for it was only a couple of pages, but it was a novella). I typed and followed my outline and 26K words later, I was done.  That story was Iron Shoes, and went on to be a Nebula finalist in 2010.  IronShoes_Draft2DigitalFinal (2)

2. I had an idea  for a long time, and finally put together an outline for the story. It was a few pages long (again, a novella), and I sat down and began typing.  Within three paragraphs, one of the throw-away characters who didn’t even have a name suddenly took on a personality…and then I had to give him a name, and a story, and a reason for even being in scene 1. (That would be Duilio). And I tossed away my outlline, then sat there and wrote in a fever until 15K later, I had a novella, “Of Ambergris, Blood, and Brandy”.  That novella was later rewritten as a novel, The Golden City (a Locus Award finalist for 2013)

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My point being that both things worked for me. Yes, I prefer to outline, but…sometimes the outline just can’t contain what’s going on with the story. Could I have written The Golden City without having Duilio Ferreira suddenly appear in it? Could I have simply followed my outline? Yes.

It would have been a different story. It might have been a better story…or a horrible one.

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Here’s what I do:

I generally start out with a halfhearted outline-usually only a few pages long. Then I start writing.  I’ve learned that for me, the outline -usually- loses contact with the story somewhere about the 2/3 mark.  (The Golden City was an aberration, with the breakaway coming on page 1. Iron Shoes, on the other hand, never broke away.)

That’s when I do my REAL outlining–at the 2/3 point. I sit down and figure out where all my plot points need to fall, how long I have, and what loose ends I still need to tie up. It’s one of the least fun parts of my writing process, because I really want to stop and get back to writing words. But I make an effort.

Then I start writing again.  And once I get to end of a novel, I check in with my outline and tweak it a bit, and start my edit pass.

So generally, I’m using a hybrid form of pantsing and plotting. It’s what works for me.

Therefore, I’m not going to come down on either side, the plotting or pantsing side. The trick is to know that one tactic isn’t necessarily better than the other.

For me, the situation appears to be this:

  1. Outlining will work for one writer, but not another.
  2. Outlining can work for one writer for one story, and yet not the next.
  3. Outlining can work in tandem with pantsing on the same story.
  4. The situation can change. Plotters become pantsers and vice versa.

So try them both out. See which fits better. Be reckless and combine them! There’s no rule that says you have to pick one method and stick with it for the rest of your life. (Unless you get a tattoo. Then you’re stuck.)

#SFWAPro

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Bonus story: At a workshop, I had to write a story in 24 hours. I plotted the snot out of that thing, researching and setting up the small world where a clockwork-type factory functioned under the streets of Paris, doling out life and death. I slept for about three hours that night, and when I got up, started writing….a TOTALLY DIFFERENT STORY. I actually managed to get that 7K monstrosity typed out before the deadline that afternoon, but it was a close shave.

That story was “Fleurs du Mal”, which was later published in Beneath Ceaseless Skies. And other than being set in Paris, it has NOTHING in common with the story I outlined.

Why this happens, I don’t know.

 

 

Writing Advice: Choose your advisors carefully

I don’t often dispense writing advice. In a lot of ways, I don’t think I’ve yet earned that right.  I’m not a million seller. There’s not a movie to be based on my works. And I’m not an industry insider. The only source from which I can draw my advice is my own admittedly-limited experience (and that of my friends).

But I’m going to dish some out anyway.

This weekend on my Tumblr feed, I ran across this quote:

“The difference between good writers and bad writers has little to do with skill. It has to do with perseverance. Bad writers quit. Good writers keep going. That’s all there is to it.”

Jeff Goins

I found this an objectionable statement, equating perseverance with ‘good writing’. I suspect that the author meant something more like “perseverance is required for successful publication“, but that’s not what he said.*

He -said- that people who quit writing aren’t good writers.

And that’s wrong. There are plenty of brilliant writers out there who are no longer publishing. This industry is brutal, and navigating its vagaries can be exhausting for an able-bodied young person with ample spare time.  For someone who’s ill; for someone whose finances barely allow them time to sleep,much less write; for someone who has 12 other projects in the work or 3 kids at home….sometimes pursuit of publication just isn’t in the cards. Not at the moment. Perhaps not ever.

That doesn’t make them a BAD writer.

For me, it was hard to balance work with writing. I was a teacher, and every moment that I spent writing was time taken away from my students’ possible futures. (This is a guilt thing). It was hard for me to work on writing when I needed to make lesson plans and grade and write grants and scholarships. So when I was teaching, I wrote very little save for during those 8 weeks of summer. That didn’t make me a BAD writer.

So my main advice here is to look at the person who’s giving you advice. In the case of the guy above, he seems to be a self-help guru with 4 books published (the most recent by his own press). Yes, he’s a big seller (on Amazon), but has he ever tried to pitch a fantasy novel to one of the Big 5?  Has he ever submitted to Clarkesworld? Has he ever tried to publish in your market?

Perhaps his advice isn’t the best match, then.

For me, the pithy statement above was simply miss-aimed. Equating talent and skill with persistence doesn’t work for me, no matter how good a little soundbite it makes.

#SFWAPro

 

 

*And yes, I’m aware that this might be out of context. I haven’t read the book. However, alone and with no context is how I encountered it being touted on Tumblr…

 

 

 

One WIP? Or many?

One of the interesting things about authors is how we’re all different. Some of us are plotters, some pantsers, and a large percentage are in between. Some write every day. Some don’t. Some have rituals or a special place to write, while others can write anywhere, anywhen.

And some of us can only work on one project at a time.

I’ve never been one of those writers. I’ve always been able to have three or four WIPs going, save when I was under a real deadline crush. In fact, for me that makes it easier.  If I’m having trouble working on WIP1, then I open WIP2 and tinker with that for a while. A lot of the time, that shakes loose whatever was bothering me about WIP1.

Recently I’ve had 3 WIPs going: After the War, The Horn, and The Sins of the Fathers. 

(I actually have opened a few other files in this time, mostly on weekends, just for fun. Sometimes we need to do ‘fun’ writing just to remind ourselves why we do this.)

But my point is that this strange way of working is what works for me.

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After the War is due to be out later this summer, which means I need to get that last section finished, and then get it out to my editor. I’ve even got a cover commissioned for it, due to me about June 15th.  Now, this is a Portugal story involving Serafina Palmeira and Alejandro Ferreira.point_of_no_return3_by_faestock

(This is the -likely- picture we’ll be using–via Faestock on DeviantArt–for the cover…the rights belong to that artist.)

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But it’s recently been The Horn and The Sins of the Fathers that have taken up most of my time.

The Sins of the Fathers (name may change) is the sequel to Dreaming Death, starting only a month later than the end of that novel. Now, this was primarily concerned with the problems caused by Shironne’s father, Mikael’s father, and to a lesser extent, Deborah’s. Hence the name.

However, the edits on the first book killed off Shironne’s father before the first book happened. He was supposed to die slowly and painfully in the first half of Book 2. Removing him also removed a lot of the issues with Mikael’s father, so…I’m having to rewrite Book 2.  This happens sometimes.

On balance, I’m okay with the changes, but it means that as I was rewriting the sequel, the murder in it seemed to work less and less, making the plot weaker and weaker. Unfortunately, how to fix that problem has eluded me for for quite a while. I’ve been spinning my wheels writing it because it just seemed…wrong.

But working on The Horn provided an answer in a very different way.

I’ve been working on that, a series of novellas set elsewhere in Larossa shortly before the events of Dreaming Death (early summer-fall).  The events of the two story lines eventually tie together.So it was of direct benefit to me to have parts of The Horn solid in my head and written down.

But while I was hunting and pecking through my old files for a spare bit of text (I really need to get in there and rename all those old files because their current names are gibberish) I ran across an old Mikael/Shironne story about a murder that…

Well, I’d never finished that 2005 story. I probably got busy with something else and never got back to it. But suddenly I had in my hands the answer to my problem with TSotF.  I could swap out the short story’s murder for the problematic one in the book. A bunch of names had changed, but  the short story was set right after the book, so there wasn’t much time or age difference.

And suddenly I knew how to fix the broken part of TSotF. I am in the process of stripping out the old murder and working in the new. I’m re-outlining the book, as much as I do outlining. And everything is moving again.

Such a relief.

The point to all of that being: For me, working on more than one project at a time is helpful.  Not true for everyone, but for me, it pays.

 

Does that work for you? Or are you a ‘one project at a time’ writer?

 

#SFWAPro

Blind in Your Mind

Recently I ran across an article that discussed being “Blind in your Mind” here. 

It was fascinating to me to read it because I could relate to almost everything the writer said. In fact, several other writers I know said the same thing. Many of us don’t picture things in our heads, and it’s rather bizarre to us that other people do.

Now I want to be clear…I am not as “mind-blind’ as the writer of this article. I dream in color all the time and often can recall snatches of those dreams.  And I do, when I think about things I’ve seen in the past, sometimes get a split-second image in my head. It fades away so quickly that I don’t get any details out of it, like an afterimage instead of a true image.

I am far more likely to recall how something moved or words related to something I’ve seen.  I cannot close my eyes and picture anyone. Not even myself–like the Bible verse, I walk away from the mirror and forget what I look like.

This does not interfere, as the article specifies, with my ability to recognize people. I can recognize people’s faces both in real life and in photographs (as some other people cannot). But if I close my eyes and try to picture them, I only see blackness.

In fact, the harder I try, the less I get. If I’m trying, I won’t even get the split-second image that I mentioned before. I suspect that my ability to recall visual images is subconscious rather than conscious.

There is probably a continuum at work here, where some people are extreme, like the man in the article. And other people picture everything in their mind’s eye, rather like an internal movie.

Some authors who mentioned having a mind’s eye said they often struggle with descriptions because they can’t get the details right enough to match what they see. For my own part, I struggle with making sure I have enough description to get across the basics for the reader.

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One of the ways I deal with this is to use photographs of characters. I often keep those on bulletin boards so I can look at my characters as I’m writing them. That way I know what they look like.

Many of these photographs are from an old stash in tubs that I’ve been collecting since college…a long time ago. I’ve recently started using Pinterest to track my pictures as well. For example, here’s my set of photos that I’m using for The Horn. I can look at the pictures any time to remind myself who my characters are.  (Although I also print them out so I can access them when I’m not online.)

 

So if you’re a writer, do you have this issue? Do you see things in your mind or not? And if not, how do you learn to describe for the reader?

#SFWAPro

Writers and their Beasts: Pat Esden

Today my guest is Pat Esden, author of the upcoming (next week!) novel A Hold on Me, which I was lucky enough to pre-read last November.

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She never wanted to return.

He wants nothing more than for her to leave.

But the fire between them is as strong as the past that haunts them.

Annie Freemont grew up on the road, immersed in the romance of rare things, cultivating an eye for artifacts and a spirit for bargaining. It’s a freewheeling life she loves and plans to continue—until her dad is diagnosed with dementia. His illness forces them to return to Moonhill, their ancestral home on the coast of Maine—and to the family they left behind fifteen years ago, after Annie’s mother died in a suspicious accident.

Once at Moonhill, Annie is shocked when her aunt separates her from her father. The next time Annie sees him, he’s a bizarre, violent shadow of his former self. Confused, she turns to an unlikely ally for support—Chase, the dangerously seductive young groundskeeper. With his dark good looks and powerful presence, Chase has an air of mystery that Annie is irresistibly drawn to. But she also senses that behind his penetrating eyes are secrets she can’t even begin to imagine. Secrets that hold the key to the past, to Annie’s own longings—and to all of their futures. Now, to unlock them, she’ll have to face her greatest fears and embrace her legacy…

 

Pre-order Today!

Indiebound  Amazon  B&N   Books-A-Million

 

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Like the rest of us, Pat can’t get through writing a single chapter without the assistance of her beasts!  Here’s what she tells me about her household menagerie:

1) Let’s start with the obvious: Tell us about your pets.

I have a twenty-three year old rescue Quaker parrot named Conrad. A pet hoarder who knew I liked birds, phoned me to say she’d been given one. I knew she had about a zillion cats and dogs, so I rushed over to see what was going on. Her house smelled so horrible, I almost gagged. Actually, I did gag. Conrad wasn’t even a year old at that point and sat in a cage on the floor surrounded by furry beasts. I was so glad that I could give her a new home. And, yes, Conrad eventually laid eggs, so he was a she.

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Our newest family member is Haley. She’s a fourteen-week-old (at the time Pat sent this) Golden Retriever. We lost our last Golden a little over a year ago and are so thrilled to have a new puppy. The house feels alive again.

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(This second photo is more recent)

2) How do they help/hinder your writing?

Conrad’s cage is right next to my downstairs desk. She is noisy, but I’ve gotten used to her screams. Mostly, she makes me smile and tells me when there are birds outside at the feeder, or squirrels.

Haley has disturbed my writing schedule a little, since she needs to go out quite often. But I’ve missed having someone to keep me company in my main upstairs office. It’s hard to stay frustrated about writing issues, when there are big brown eyes looking at you.

3) Do they appear in any of your works?

All my earlier novels had dogs in them. The Dark Heart series has cats—tons of cats and, in later books, one specific cat. I have to laugh a little; the only cats in my life have been the feral ones that hunt birds my garage.

4) How does being a pet owner affect your writing (philosophically?)

This is one reason I wanted to get a puppy. Pets help me get out of my own head and, as illogical as that sounds, that allows me see my stories clearer. I tend to go outside more, take more walks, play more, and that allows my subconscious time to work and gets my creativity going. They give me joy and force me to have fun.

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pat-225PAT ESDEN is an antique-dealing florist by trade. She’s also a member of Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America, Romance Writers of America, and the League of Vermont Writers. Her short stories have appeared in a number of publications, including Orson Scott Card’s Intergalactic Medicine Show, the Mythopoeic Society’s Mythic Circle literary magazine, and George H. Scither’s anthology Cat Tales.

Her new adult paranormal novel, A HOLD ON ME (book #1 in the Dark Heart series) is coming February 23 from Kensington Books and BEYOND YOUR TOUCH (book #2 Dark Heart series) will be released August 30th.

You can find Pat at:

WEBSITE |GOODREADS |FACEBOOK|TWITTER | BLOG |PINTEREST|

The Grand Patreon Experiment

Patreon.jpgIn the arena of things I’m trying to do to get my readership/constituency up and to put out more stories/ebooks, I’ve established a Patreon.

Now, if you don’t know what a Patreon is, imagine your favorite writer as Public Radio. Instead of trying to get $300,000, they’re trying to reach $300. A little different, but in the same vein. We ask for money from contributor to help defray our costs. Patreon’s a little like Public Radio’s ‘sustaining membership’, except that you can start at $1 or less per month.

Why would I consider this? Because I’m in the middle of trying to revamp my current ebooks and put out a handful more.

It costs money. While I could spend a couple of months and learn to format ebooks myself, I won’t get any writing done. I could shell out for a copy of Photoshop and take a couple of classes on design, or I could hire someone to make covers for me (which are surprisingly full of requirements and rules and stuff on how to get everything to fit on the bookseller and that.)  I don’t think I actually have any design skills, so classes would only take me so far.

And therefore, I’m hiring people to do it. And that costs a lot of money. I’m still firmly in the red on The Seer’s Choice, even though it’s been out there for almost 4 months now.

So I’ve decided to try using Patreon to help defray those costs.

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To figure out the best way to pitch this, I turned to the Public Radio playbook. (There are a few online, btw.)

Here’s my favorite: (shortened a bit because of TL:DR issues)

BREAK #6: The Meaning of “Member Supported” Radio Patron Supported Writing

The theme for our spring membership drive is , “PSW, your renewable resource.”

Like all renewable resources, PSW is there for you every day, 365 days out of year, powering you through your day with great music, local and international news  writing. But like all renewable resources, it takes wise use and careful stewardship of that resource to keep it flowing.

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Okay, I honestly shortened that a lot. But you’ve heard the pitches, and there’s nothing particularly new I can say.  I’m not great at sales. I couldn’t sell you a used car if I tried.

But I can write fiction. I won’t send you a coffee cup or a sweatshirt of a copy of Downton Abbey Season 28 (subtitled: Everyone Gets Old), but I can provide content that will go to the Patreon supporters first.

So if you’re interested in supporting writers (I’m -not- the only one with a Patreon these days!), then go over to their site and look around.

Here’s my link, J. Kathleen Cheney is creating Fiction. (It’s also at the top of the sidebar.)

Thanks!

#SFWAPro

 

 

 

Writers and their Beasts: Coral Moore

Today my guest is Coral Moore, here to talk about her most recent book and some of the furry companions in her life.

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(EROTICA) Mirabel Soto disconnected herself from the many people and places that triggered memories of her husband following his death. She’s avoided everything that might remind her of him for three years and never looked back. Until the owner of Midnight, the BDSM club they frequented, calls her for a favor and she finds what she was missing in the form of a very large, very troubled former marine. Carson Brewer returned from the service broken. Discovering the source of his trauma may be the key to helping him cope with post-military life, but he shuts down whenever he’s confronted about what happened. Only pain brings him peace.

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But what Coral is here to talk about is her DOGS!

So without further ado:

1) Let’s start with the obvious: Tell us about your pets.

Currently I am the caretaker to two canines. The old lady is Shiva, a mixed breed rescue dog who will be 14 in February. (Shiva is the black and white one pictured trying to climb into my strawberry patch.)

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The young pup is Clementine, a three-year-old Catahoula Leopard Dog. (Clem is the silly girl wearing one of my hoodies.)

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(This, by the way, gets my vote for one of the cutest shots I’ve had on here so far!!!)

I am aquariumless for the moment, but I hope to change that in the near future.

2) How do they help/hinder your writing?

Before I got Clementine in April I would have said that my writing was unaffected, but having a two-year-old dog bred for hunting and herding has changed my outlook on that a little. She’s very smart, and super active, so she demands quite a lot of my attention.

(As the blog owner, I’m posting this one to show that there are occasional down times!)

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3) Do they appear in any of your works?

So far neither of them have. I’m working on a fantasy story now that has an animal who has a personality a bit like Clementine’s though it’s more a fox-like animal than a dog. I think that suits Clem’s personality though, she’s very canny and has an obvious sense of humor.

4) How does being a pet owner affect your writing (philosophically?)

I think it does. Animals are treated pretty kindly in my works. I’m not sure I could ever write a story where an animal, especially a dog, is mistreated or dies.

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518-0rHSdEL._UX250_Coral Moore writes character-driven fiction, mostly of the speculative variety. She loves aquariums, rides a motorcycle, and thinks there is little better in life than a good cup of coffee. She has had fiction published by Vitality Magazine, Dreamspinner Press, and Evernight Press. You can find her at her website (http://www.coralmoore.com/) or on Twitter @coralm.
You can find Coral at:

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Writers and their Beasts: Michelle Muenzler

 

Today I have a guest visiting to talk about the relationship between herself and her beasts: Michelle Muenzler. To be fair, when I asked for potential names for this series, she suggested the title: By the Paw and the Pen. Although I chose not to change over to that title, feel free to mentally think of her post as one of those.

Michelle is, BTW, one of the writers with whom I meet regularly, both as a member of Future Classics and as a group that meets bi-weekly at a local coffee shop. She’s a great sounding board for me, and you might just spot her name on the Acknowledgements page of my upcoming novel, Dreaming Death. 

So without further ado, here’s Michelle Muenzler!

1. Tell us about your pets.
Despite my husband’s allergy to cats, we have found ourselves adopted by four of them. Smokey is an old soul, a touch diabetic now in his dotage, and prone to licking sweat from my husband’s beard. Nin believes herself to be half cat, half bird, half baby seal and in no way a deadly ninja secretly plotting to kill us.
Nin
The ever-fretsome Persephone used to love long walks around the outside of our house meowing at us through every window until we agreed to adopt her (and her growing belly) but now prefers to laze about inside unless I am exercising, at which point she is quite convinced I should exercise my hands to pet her instead.
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And her son, the lithe kitten Vibur–whom I must point out is several years past official kittendom now–spends most of his time spooning with Smokey and making some of the most pathetic mewing noises you have ever heard. He also loves destroying toilet paper, but oddly only if the toilet lid is left up.
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2. How do they help/hinder your writing?

So long as it isn’t too close to their feeding times, my goons generally sleep peacefully about their various claimed territories in the house. Come feeding time, though, they excel in monitor blocking techniques and dragging the router off the desk. Occasionally, Smokey lets it be known that he intends to own my lap, and no amount of dissuading him will work, so I try to make do. Less do is made when he and Vibur are spooning in my writing chair–sure I feel guilty disrupting their cuddle time, but a woman has to write…and they can spoon in my husband’s chair just as well as they can in mine.

3. Do they appear in any of your works?

Out of sheer terror, I almost said no to this question, but then I remembered that my cats are illiterate, so it is safe to share information that might not otherwise be shared. While none of my cats are specifically named in any of my works, it would be remiss of me to not point out one of my recent publications, “The Cats’ Game”, over at Daily Science Fiction. If that doesn’t summarize all cats, I’m not sure what does.

4. How does being a pet owner affect your writing (philosophically)?

I find writing to be much like cleaning out the litter box. It can be challenging to convince myself to do it every day, but life is much less stinky when I keep up with it.

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MichelleMuenzler-FenCon2011 (2)Michelle Muenzler, also known at local conventions as “The Cookie Lady”, writes fiction both dark and strange to counterbalance the sweetness of her baking. Her fiction and poetry have been published in magazines such as Star*Line, Daily Science Fiction, and Apex Magazine, and she takes immense joy in crinkling words like little foil puppets. You can find her at: https://www.facebook.com/michelle.muenzler